Author Topic: hammer veneering pier table apron  (Read 3430 times)

tischler

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hammer veneering pier table apron
« on: February 10, 2009, 01:23:42 AM »
I have been hammer veneering a pier table apron with some very burled walnut. I mixed the glue fairly thin to give me work time solo and I am getting terrific adhesion, quick gel  and tight vertical seams everywhere, except the horizontal edges are wrinkling up about 1/4" in from the top and bottom of the apron. I can reheat and get the parts to stick, but I was wanting an opinion about how much overhang to have on the veneers to begin with. I have about 1/2" now, is that too much, since hammer veneering allows such easy repositioning? and yes I pre-shrunk all the veneer with an iron before beginning. Perhaps I should notch the veneer along the edges like you do cloth to get it to lay flat in a curve? Any experience or advise? Thanks.

Michael Armand

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Re: hammer veneering pier table apron
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2009, 09:59:59 PM »
Tischler...
                   I was curious to know did you hammer veneer because this was your only option to apply it in a circle?  Have you tried other glues and methods to apply veneers on curved surfaces?

tischler

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Re: hammer veneering pier table apron
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2009, 03:13:55 AM »
Michael, I have used a number of options for curved veneering. I have used male and female molds with PVA glue, also articulated wood and plexiglass molds laid out directly over plotter printed arch templates with a resin glue and I've ironed on sheets brushed with PVA glue that has been allowed to dry somewhat, using an old clothes iron as an accelerator. I was pleased with the results of all of them, but I wanted to hammer veneer this piece to get away from the modern methods for a change and not tax my wrists with the usual clampathon. I've worked for both French and German furnituremakers/ cabinetmakers and they used hammer veneering mostly for antique restoration and PVA for everything else. They preferred hammer veneering actually, but this was in Houston, so the humidity swings made them shy away from it. I was very fortunate to work for them and not have to leave the states. This was in two different shops, but they had the same technique. They always told me to preshrink the veneer and then heat two pieces of wood or MDF with an iron and store the veneer between them under weight as you did the prep work to the substrate. Then brush the ground (substrate) with glue, next the underside of the veneer, lay the veneer on the ground and then brush the face of the veneer, then set the end or the joint  with the hammer depending on if you're just starting or continuing. Then work from the center- out  squeezing out the excess. They allowed the veneer to cure completely then scraped the face clean, never washing anything off in the interim. The veneer pieces were never very large and they concealed joints under the table legs. I was able to get better results as I continued around the ground last night by using a small spring clamp to hold the very edge flat only where needed and reducing overhang to 3/16 or so. As the veneers cured and contracted the edge bond was great, it shrunk to the ground and  I was really relieved. At the shop where I work during the day, they produce high end custom curved architectural components daily, full half circle and elliptical  arched doors, frames, casing, serpentine mouldings, the works, and we are always debating methods, clamping, laminations, cauls you name it. I am really taken with hammer veneering now, because it does away with 80% of the fixturing and jig work needed. I don't think my current employers have enough experience with it to trust it in a commercial context since our glue-ups can be 14' plus, but for freestanding pieces, I prefer it. Thanks for your interest. 

rococojo

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Re: hammer veneering pier table apron
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2009, 10:07:23 AM »
Tischler. If the wave in the venner is exesive, you will not rub it down without a cut to let it lay
flat?, becase the centure as layed flat, any wave as moved to the edges, as you say, with cloth, cuts  have to be made to lay down the edges, you are answering you own question Sir.

Nice to hear you are using the old ways.
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