Author Topic: Glazing for glass in corner cupboard doors  (Read 5745 times)

carheir

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Glazing for glass in corner cupboard doors
« on: January 13, 2009, 10:32:04 PM »
I am restoring a corner cupboard that was in a fire and noticed that the glass (what is left) was glazed in.  Any thoughts as to what was used back then to glaze glass in place?  Any help would be appreciated.


Mike Shelley
Carolina Heirlooms
mshelley@nc.rr.com

rococojo

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Re: Glazing for glass in corner cupboard doors
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2009, 07:07:33 PM »
Hi Mike, I think the first method used to fix glass, would be the simplest way?
And that would be with timber beads, just fixed by nailing in place, this method would only be altered to stop, Draft, Shock & Rain. (Outside work).
 Design would take over then.
The straight glazed in look you are restoring, would be down to the furniture designer.
No need for stopping, shock, wind or water, as it is inside a building.
           
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msiemsen

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Re: Glazing for glass in corner cupboard doors
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2009, 10:04:15 PM »
I pulled this from the NAWCC site where this topic as discussed. I think it is much easier to use a glazing compound on a curved door than it is to put in sticks. to be accurate glazing is the glass,and the operation of installing the glass, glazing compound is the stuff you asked about. Here is the quoted text:

"Hi,
Someone mentioned whiting (calcium carbonate), which is commonly available from any/all hardware and paint stores for thickening paint or for sports fields.
I mix up whiting with pigment powder to get the color I want and then mix with shellac to a stiff consistency. It is easily reversible, can be colored as desired. If you are already working with shellac, you should have all the ingredients, except the whiting.
Personally, I don't like the oil-based putties but I'd use them before I ever used Rock Hard on an antique.
Craig


and also:

I think that shellac based putty is what the clock makers used originally.A sample of the old putty will dissolve in alcohol leaving the whitting and pigment.The clock makers did not have months to wait for linseed based putty to dry,and it would have softened up in the peddler's wagon in the summer heat,while shellac based putty dries in a day or two.
David


I haven't tried this but it makes sense, see if the glazing compound on your restoration dissolves in alcohol and let use know how this works.
Mike
Mike Siemsen
Green Lake Clock Company
There are II kinds of people in the world. Those that can read roman numerals and those that can't

carheir

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Re: Glazing for glass in corner cupboard doors
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2009, 10:06:17 PM »
Hey Mike,

Thanks for the info.  I will try some DNA on one of the panes Monday and let you know if it dissolves the glazing compound. 

Mike
« Last Edit: January 17, 2009, 10:11:36 PM by carheir »

msiemsen

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Re: Glazing for glass in corner cupboard doors
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2009, 10:45:39 PM »
I like that, DNA testing, now that is science!
Mike
Mike Siemsen
Green Lake Clock Company
There are II kinds of people in the world. Those that can read roman numerals and those that can't

rococojo

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Re: Glazing for glass in corner cupboard doors
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2009, 05:48:03 AM »
I am restoring a corner cupboard that was in a fire and noticed that the glass (what is left) was glazed in.  Any thoughts as to what was used back then to glaze glass in place?  Any help would be appreciated.


Mike Shelley
Carolina Heirlooms
mshelley@nc.rr.com
 
Mike, did I miss read your Q? (I think not, after re-reading it) I was explaining the first method used, only to illustrate why your job was glazed in, without any putty.
(Glazing compound) these were developed to correct the earlier mistakes, which I talked about in my reply, now if you ask when putty was first made/used?
That is a different question. Sorry if I confused anyone.

                                                    Joseph Hemingway

carheir

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Re: Glazing for glass in corner cupboard doors
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2009, 05:41:06 PM »
Joseph,

I can see where the confusion lies.  What I meant to ask was "What kind of glazing compound" was used back in the day.  Unless you have a better alternative, I will try the whiting,pigment, shellac formula and see if that will work.

Thanks,
Mike

rococojo

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Re: Glazing for glass in corner cupboard doors
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2009, 08:34:52 PM »
Joseph,

I can see where the confusion lies.  What I meant to ask was "What kind of glazing compound" was used back in the day.  Unless you have a better alternative, I will try the whiting,pigment, shellac formula and see if that will work.

Thanks,
Mike
Mike, No I have no alternative, as this was stated in the following post by mike, and you are to try as an alternative soon, its more a Contradiction, than confusion? Sourly,
 if  if, forget it?
no beans Spilled, hoping the compound is ok for you.

                                                    Joseph Hemingway
« Last Edit: January 19, 2009, 07:58:39 AM by rococojo »