Author Topic: A Build along Virginia table  (Read 16558 times)

Jeff L Headley

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Re: A Build along Virginia table
« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2009, 09:25:03 PM »
I have squared the front edge and a side of my top with the maybe a 1/2" to play with extra. All my hand work on my outside edge is in vain. I forgot I have a shaped top. No wonder I have a hard time earning a living. Now I will cut it to it's final dimensions, my top not my living. While the top is square and before it gets shaped I will hand plane all machine marks and any abuse marks which have occurred during glue up off both top and bottom. The top has square edges with rounded corners and a serpentine front, back, and sides. I will saw the corners round 2 1/2" in from each corner. The front and back will get a 5/8" deep(from the outside edge in)  and the sides will get 1/2" deep serpentine cut. I will clean up this edge with my spokeshave. I love my spokeshave. The whole top gets a 1" bevel along the underside with a 1/2" edge exposed.
Now for the drawer. Oh my wife is calling. Later for the drawer

Jeff L Headley

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Re: A Build along Virginia table
« Reply #31 on: February 10, 2009, 09:49:34 PM »
Bearers and guides.
I will need to cut my guides, for my drawers, which will be glued to the side rails . They want to be 1 1/8" X 1/2" X 11". The 1/2" measurement I will leave strong and fit to my case. By this I mean I will saw then hand plane the 1 1/8 width from a 9/16" thick piece. Cut to length at 11" it should fit in between the front leg and back leg on the left and right sides flush with the bottom of the sides. The guide will have to be notched around the backside of the front bottom rail. The 9/16" side will protrude passed the inside edge of the legs. I will hand plane the guide flush with the legs before nailing. The bearer (which supports the drawer) needs to be 3/8" X 3/8" x 10 1/2". The bearer starts behind the front bottom rail and runs to just shy of the back. I will nail these in, just as the original. They should not be glued.  I will not nail the bearers in completely. I may need to adjust them to fit my drawer later. Not to say that my dovetailing of my drawers won't be perfect. Ha Ha In my dreams.
I would like to discuss clean up or surface preparation. We do use machines but try to remove all machine marks. To remove these marks we will use hand planes, flat scrapers, and sandpaper on the outside surfaces. A hand paned surface, without tear out, is probably the best way to go but in combination with other surfaces can cause finishing problems. A hand planed surface will take stains or dyes differently from a sanded surface. Most of our clients don't want the ripple surface from a hand plane on say a dining table top. This will require scraping and I have not been happy with my hand scraped surface for a direct finishing surface. I will sand with modern sand paper and a sanding block. Starting with 120 Garnet paper sanding to 220 saving the worn out 220 for sanding the dyed surface later in the finishing process. After the 120 I will wipe water on the finished surface with a wet rag to raise the grain before staining or dyeing then after drying sand to 220.

John Grandestaff

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Re: A Build along Virginia table
« Reply #32 on: February 13, 2009, 04:14:34 PM »
Jeff, when you finish the drawer, do you do anything to the drawer sides and bottom or do you just put finish on the front? Thanks John

Jeff L Headley

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Re: A Build along Virginia table
« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2009, 06:56:18 PM »
John,  What a great question. Yes we do color our drawers. I would like our pieces to blend in with our clients, or potential clients, pieces. Most don't want the stark white secondary wood. Do you think that someone else 200 years ago might have done the same thing? What a silly question.

John Grandestaff

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Re: A Build along Virginia table
« Reply #34 on: February 16, 2009, 07:24:35 PM »
I don't think that they would waist their time (or money) back then, or would they? I really don't know.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: A Build along Virginia table
« Reply #35 on: February 16, 2009, 10:55:05 PM »
Drawer
A drawer is a mini exploration into case construction. It's a box. The same joinery will be used to build a drawer as you would use to build maybe a Chippendale chest carcass. Although most case backs don't slide up a groove or dato from the bottom.
This drawer is constructed slightly different than we would normally build a drawer. By that I mean the front has a shaped bottom.  I guess a brief description of how we go about constructing a drawer might be useful.
I cheat on drawer construction, not by joinery but by technique. We will sandwich our drawer sides together with the outsides facing each other. I will cut the groove for the drawer bottom on both drawer sides and the back side of the drawer front at the same time using a 1/4"shaper cutter or a 1/4" data blade on a table saw or a 1/4"rabit plane. The top of the rabit needs to be about 5/8" up from the drawer sides bottom edge. This will leave room for about 3/16" of wear below the 7/16" dawer bottom with future use of the drawer. The reason for sandwichiching the drawer sides is I will use a bandsaw to saw out the tails. So for every drawer I will have half the dovetails to cut out. Over a bunch of drawers or a high chest it means quite a lot less work. I can use a dovetail saw but a bandsaw works also. After the groove for the drawer bottom and the tails (both front and back) have been cut I will seperate the drawer sides and then go about laying out the pins. To lay out the pins a will cut a 1/4 thick piece maybe 2" X 2"  I will set it in the drawer bottom 1/4"groove  so that the drawer side and front interlock. I have not told you that I will set my cutting gauge to 7/16" this will be the length of my tails and the depth of the pins, marking both for how far the drawer sides goes into the back side of the drawer front. I will try to explain thing better in my next posting.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: A Build along Virginia table
« Reply #36 on: February 25, 2009, 06:42:20 PM »
Drawer again
After cutting the tails both front and back, the front pins are always finer than the back pins, on the sides while they were sandwiched together I will separate them. With my drawer front clamped in my vise face out and the left or right edge up about 3" above the top of my bench. I will get a 3" X 3" X ? set it on my bench to support the back side of my drawer side. I will stick my 2" X 2" X 1/4" piece in the slot for the drawer bottom in the drawer side and in the back side of the drawer front. This 1/4" lines up your front and side. Slide your side up to the cutting gauge line you marked earlier and then mark with a thin blade knife. I like a knife that has a good point but isn't terribly sharp so that when I mark my pins I won't slice off the bottom edge of my tails which will do two things ruin my fit and my day. I will take the drawer front out of my vise turn it around so the face is in or the back is facing me. I will indent my lines a little deeper with my dull knife so I can see the lines better then indent each line where it intersects the corner. This is to set your knife in then slide a square over against you knife and scribe a line down the back side of the drawer front to your 7/16" cutting gauge line. I will continue this line past the cutting gauge mark. With my dovetail saw I will saw down the line at an angle with the outside edge of the saw on the inside edge of my line and yes I will saw past the 7/16" cutting gauge mark on the back side of the drawer front. Taking my drawer fronts to my mortiser I will mortise out most of the waist staying 1/16" away from my saw lines. The 1/16" is to use as a lever with my chisel so I won't damage the edge of my pins. I will also stay about 1/16" from the bottom of the tails to clean up and fit by hand. The back is done mostly the same way. The drawer back starts above the slot for the drawer bottom so the bottom can slide in underneath. the back runs up even with the top of the drawer sides,  marked and then sawn the same way I will use the band saw to saw most of the waist away and then fit by hand. After all is fit I will glue up and then slide in case to dry. The next day I will cut the bottom 11 3/4" deep  12 1/2" wide  3/8" thick with a bevel edge to 1/4" I will saw this angle on the table saw then clean up cross grain with a spoke shave and a hand plane with the grain. Please remember that the slot for the drawer bottom on the back side of this drawer front has to be cut at a different depth up from the bottom again because of the shaped bottom of the drawer front.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: A Build along Virginia table
« Reply #37 on: February 25, 2009, 09:48:12 PM »
One thing to add to my drawer posting. I will cut the shape in the drawer front before I glue up the drawer.

I would fasten this top as we would fasten most tops in general. I
would set my cutting gauge to 3/4" mark a line on the inside in the
center of the sides and back. With the table standing up on the floor
I would drill down from the top of the sides and back at an angle and
staying away from outside edge a hole down so that it comes out about
a 1/4" to an 1/8" below my mark. I would then drill a hole down thru
the rail towards the inside. That way if I slip screwing the top down
I won't srcew up the  front of the rail. I will lay the table on each
side and then the back and cut down my 3/4" line at an angle away from
the hole on either side this sets my bottom for my screw depth. With a
carving chisel I will carve out a cavity for my screws and counter
sink the rail. Then I will lay the top, bottom up ,on my bench making
sure there is no trash to scar the top later and clamp it down so it
can't shift as I tighten down my screws slightly tightening all screws
and give all a final snugging. After removing the clamps I will
hopefully flip the table over, making sure I have not screwed it to my
bench.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: A Build along Virginia table
« Reply #38 on: February 27, 2009, 09:18:15 PM »
What have I forgotten? I would like to try this with other projects, if there is any interest, but I am sure I have not explained the steps properly for someone else to build this piece at their shop so I am curious what could help explain this better, more pictures better explanations or what. Any advise would be greatly appreciated. I thought a build along could work for lots of different pieces and people.

klkirkman

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Re: A Build along Virginia table
« Reply #39 on: February 27, 2009, 09:59:35 PM »
Jeff,

I  both enjoyed, and learned from, your blow-by-blow project description.

The most valuable information for me were the asides that touched on things never mentioned in the typical articles like how much oversize to rough size stock, tricks to check for distortion as pieces approach final dimensions, etc.

You made me realize that in wood we more often sneak up on a fimished piece that make it in final form directly from the start as is often portrayed. Having been trained in wood, but primarily in machine shop work, one gets to thinking of making a bunch of parts from the detail drawings and then assembling them, and that is not how you work.

I do no tmean to criticize the traditional articles, but want to tell you what was valuable.

Karl
Karl

Jeff L Headley

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Re: A Build along Virginia table
« Reply #40 on: March 16, 2009, 09:22:33 PM »
Karl, Thank you for your reply. I have been asked to do plans for pieces but how do you take care of the surprises which pop up. That is what building period furniture is all about sneaking up on a joint. Getting it to fit as close as possible and still leave room for glue. You can plan and design all you want, it is dealing with the day to day surprises which keep you on your toes.