Author Topic: Parisian Architects Table  (Read 11291 times)

Clay

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Re: Parisian Architects Table
« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2008, 03:02:34 PM »
Re: TTALMA

Yes Please do I have found zero on line from Peabody so far, I need to give them a call, if you could ask them where they have one and get really good photos of the builders marks and joints that would be marvelous....Was it English or French would be my burning question,I am sure they will say American, but it was from either a derived English and by extension a French design....

I gave Peabody a call but the curators were out and the photo center archives needed an object number, so I struck out.....will try again.


Re: Ronald Young:

Thanks for this...yes they are good photos and excellent for a drawing, 2 Q's


Q1: Did you actually create a drawing or are you offering too?

Q2: I am not familiar at all with the joints, especially the racks for the stays, how was it accomplished..
« Last Edit: October 09, 2008, 04:54:50 PM by Clay »

Ronald Young

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Re: Parisian Architects Table
« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2008, 03:29:07 PM »
Q1:I am planning to make a Architects desk early next year. I make full size drawings before I build any piece of furniture and will be making a drawing of the architect desk this winter. I have not considered selling of sharing the drawing just yet. It might be a good article to submitt to American Period Furniture for consideration.
Q2: See Fine Woodworking Issue 144, " Thomas Jefferson Writing Desk":  it has a similar support rack for the writing surface.

Clay

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Re: Parisian Architects Table
« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2008, 03:52:26 PM »
All,

Seeing the potential interest in the topic, I thought you might be interested in seeing this piece of work for an architects table of the 19th century. Possibly a little too late for the forums preference for "period" but I found it quite interesting...I dont know what the "bounds of the Calandar year"  is for furniture, but it would be quite a project to reproduce..

Sliding top which can be unfolded in different ways using several rack rails. England , 19th Century.

Height : 33.46 in
Depth : 28.15 in
Breadth : 44.68 in

Stamped : Lever
: England , 19th Century.


Clay

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Re: Parisian Architects Table
« Reply #18 on: October 08, 2008, 03:56:00 PM »
Ron,

you read my mind!  excellent and I hope you go through with the article for sure,...as to the Jefferson writing desk I do have that article and will re-read it I was not confident the design approach was accurate however....

Clay

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Re: Parisian Architects Table History
« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2008, 04:51:42 PM »
For Ron, here is what I know of the architect table history....

Ron,

A bit of history for your potential article:

American Architects Table:

Generally spread through Mass and Philadelphia from a relationship with Thomas Jefferson and the govenor Dickenson..may have been constructed by Thomas Jeffersons Monticello carpenters or williamsburg cabinet makers...the jury is still out...and details are based on family history and Monticello histroy as you probably well know.


Now: Jefferson was in Paris as a diplomat.....where he probably saw his first example...Jefferson was in the courts of France...David Roentgen was appointed the Cabinet Maker to Marie Antoinette and ultimatelly King Louis XVI.

 David had a more famous father Named Abraham Roentgen and had contacts that David used no doubt.

David was a German Cabinet Maker from Germany with three offices in Paris, Vienna and Weisbadn (sp?). One of the first international offices for furniture.

You should also know that David Roentgen created mechanical tables of many designs and was extrordianry and well known for his time to include a short time in England viewing Thomas Chippendale Ideas and being included in his pattern books without direct reference to Roentgen.....

In addition David received a commission from Russia through th Czar and shipped 50 pieces of furniture to the Hermitage for the Family there.....quite a guy quite a legacy for a wood worker......

pampine

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Re: Parisian Architects Table
« Reply #20 on: October 10, 2008, 10:23:11 PM »
Q1:I am planning to make a Architects desk early next year.
...
Q2: See Fine Woodworking Issue 144, " Thomas Jefferson Writing Desk":  it has a similar support rack for the writing surface.

First thing I thought of when I saw the photos in this thread was Jefferson's writing desk, although I'm not sure how important this is. It may well be that any adjustable top would have to have a similar structure.

Will the desk you plan to build be used for real work or just display? If real work, I think I'd rather have one with the drawer/legs coming out of the side rather than the front.

Pam

Clay

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Re: Parisian Architects Table
« Reply #21 on: November 16, 2008, 02:41:41 PM »
did you ever make it to the museum and get some pictures of an architects table? I tried direct contact and had no luck...

ttalma

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Re: Parisian Architects Table
« Reply #22 on: November 17, 2008, 10:48:20 AM »
Clay,
 Sorry I didn't post on this sooner. But I was unable to make it to the PEM while I was in Boston. Unfortunatly work got in the way. And since they were paying I figured that I better go that route.

I didn't make it to John Adams house either. Unfortunatly the two big activities I had planed while I was there didn't come to pass.
There are 10 types of people in this world, those that understand binary and those that don't.

Roger Myers

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PEM pics
« Reply #23 on: November 17, 2008, 12:39:44 PM »
a little late to this post as I have been traveling, but here are a few pics of that table at the PEM... Actually the pics are from three different visits and this table is one I always grab a pic of....  pics aren't the best, but if you are looking for a detail on this, I might have it... I had to reduce these in size for posting. 


Also, PEM's notes for the table list it as a "Drawing Table" Ca 1810, Salem Mass, with caving attributed to Samuel McIntire, but no attribution to the Seymours.  If you contact the PEM it is catalogued as piece td2002.4.2

Roger
« Last Edit: November 17, 2008, 12:50:00 PM by Roger Myers »
Woodworking and period furniture enthusiast.  Member and past president of the Guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers.

Roger Myers

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PEM pic
« Reply #24 on: November 17, 2008, 12:42:49 PM »
another pic
Woodworking and period furniture enthusiast.  Member and past president of the Guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers.

Roger Myers

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PEM table 3rd pic
« Reply #25 on: November 17, 2008, 12:44:03 PM »
last pic...
Woodworking and period furniture enthusiast.  Member and past president of the Guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers.

Clay

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Re: Parisian Architects Table
« Reply #26 on: November 20, 2008, 04:41:31 PM »
Excellent thank you! I will cntact them with the ID also...