Author Topic: posting your skills and qualifications for all to see  (Read 14732 times)

Rick Lasita

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    • First Light Woodworking
Re: posting you skills and quolifcations all to see
« Reply #15 on: January 19, 2008, 10:55:42 AM »
I read this initial post with a grin on my face and then got down to Mike W's response and was totally amused and in alignment with him. While I am indeed impressed with the Dr's creds I too feel this type of message is what intimidates those of us wood butchers who do it for the shear enjoyment of the work. Maybe build a funtional piece, period or not, that we and our families can enjoy, and have no intention of making a living at it. I have in the past made a couple of bucks making furniture for some people and will continue to do so when I retire, but only to pay the greens fees. The type of work shown on his website should serve to inspire, but in combination with the initial post, I suspect it will intimedate some more than inspire. My 2 cents. Rick
firstlightwoodworking.blogspot.com

Sam Yerardi

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Re: posting you skills and quolifcations all to see
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2008, 03:43:17 PM »
Hello,

My name is Sam Yerardi and I live in southern Ohio.  I am a 52 year old electrical engineer and part-time furniture builder.  I am new to the society and to this forum.  I appreciate the opportunity to be a part of this wonderful field.  I have done woodworking for a long time but it has only been in the last couple of years that I have devoted to learning as much as I can about reproducing period furniture.  Aside from what my late father taught me I am self-taught.  I drive my wife crazy every evening pouring through books by Gottshall, Margon, Marlow, Carlyle Lynch, etc., and all of the issues of Fine Woodworking.

I attached a picture of a Queen Anne cherry low boy I just finished.  It's not a true reproduction as I ran out of 4x4 stock and ended up making the rear legs out of straight 2 x 2 stock.  Other than that it is very close to one I saw in an old issue of Magazine Antiques.  I only used a bandsaw to do the general outlines of the cabrioles but everything else I did using old restored hand tools.

I would love to be able to say I am a well seasoned furniture builder but I'm not.  I'm still learning day by day.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2008, 03:46:33 PM by Sam Yerardi »

Jeff Saylor

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Re: posting you skills and quolifcations all to see
« Reply #17 on: January 25, 2008, 12:56:30 PM »
Sam,

That's exactly what I think SAPFM's all about- bringing together experts in the field, professional woodworkers, "seasoned furniture builders", as well as the weekend warriors who just need a little inspiration and guidance to go to the next level.
 
I've taught Industrial Arts- Furnituremaking for 34 years and have been woodworking since pre-junior high (anyone remember making skateboards with steel skates and big enough for 2 people to ride in like a toboggan on cement!) and through SAPFM, I'm still learning new skills and techniques in furniture construction that I bring into my high school shop classes.  Think about it- when you stop learning-- you are probably dead!  It's what you're learning that has an effect on the rest of your life.  And if period furniture is where you want to go- this is the place and these are the people.  The wealth of information just from this forum is worth the dues to me.  Add to this the American Period Furniture Journal, the friendships you develop at the mid-year conferences---- PRICELESS!

Welcome to SAPFM.

P.S.: Great looking lowboy.  I hope you signed and dated it for your grandkids to remember you by!
Jeff Saylor
SAPFM #211  Hobbies include hunting, fishing, making furniture, searching for old tools at flea markets.

walkerg

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Re: posting you skills and quolifcations all to see
« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2008, 07:16:58 PM »
I wanted to reply to Sam. Welcome to SAPFM. If you haven't already signed up for the spring meeting, we have a great local chapter with meetings twice a year right in your neck of the woods. Our next meeting is in March in Lancaster (you can find more details under the Ohio Valley Chapter). Please join us and bring along your furniture piece. Incidently this spring meeting will be focussing on chairs, so if you have a chair you have built please bring that along also. Really a super opportunity to meet a great group of people. Chances are good you may meet another woodworker in your own back yard you didn't know about. Hope to see you there!

George Walker
George Walker - hobbiest 25 years, pretty much a hand tool guy, fascinated with 18th century classical design.

Sam Yerardi

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Re: posting you skills and quolifcations all to see
« Reply #19 on: January 28, 2008, 12:43:31 PM »
Jeff,

Thanks for the welcome!

walkerg,

Thanks!  I'm planning on coming to the meeting in Lancaster.  Not sure if I'll bring the low boy.  I don't want to get discouraged :).  I think this first one I'll just observe if that's ok. 

walkerg

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Re: posting you skills and quolifcations all to see
« Reply #20 on: January 28, 2008, 06:39:23 PM »
Sam,

I look forward to meeting you in March in Lancaster. The ORV (Ohio River Valley) chapter draws in woodworkers with a wide range of skill and interests and a real passion for period furniture. It's always a great weekend of good fun and learning.

Regards

George Walker
George Walker - hobbiest 25 years, pretty much a hand tool guy, fascinated with 18th century classical design.

rococojo

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Regarding my judgment and craftsmanship in Rococo Furniture
« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2008, 12:25:07 PM »
In my answer to "Posting your Skills, only the unskilled would object"
Quite a few interesting questions arose, namely the interrupting of the design 23r. I would like to explain, and invite theses objectors to inspect what Chippendale states in his “Preface” of his masterpiece.
” The Gentleman & Cabinetmakers Director”
 His last paragraph he writes!
Upon the whole, "I have given no Design but what may be executed with by the hands of a skillful workman".
And further on in the same paragraph!
 "That every Design in this book can be improved, both
as to Beauty and Enrichment, in the execution of it".
Now that tells me as the maker? In today’s world.
All the design is sound and achievable; one can lessen the carving, or improve if one so desires, but the design outline is true.
"So I decided to follow my mentor of the late 50s,Norman Holroyd, regarding the short grain, throughout the piece, strengthen before you carve".
Now just because it looks like it could sheer on the short grain, beleave the "Maker", it will not.
Now regarding all joints?
All joints are “Mortise & Tenon” there are no dowels used in the main construction.
And lastly," Chippendale Director chairs are a thing of beauty; to be seen, it was there TV, to be viewed".
Would you sit in your television set?