Author Topic: Charleston Museums and historic houses  (Read 456 times)

Sam Rhodes

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Charleston Museums and historic houses
« on: June 12, 2018, 08:30:13 PM »
I’m heading to Charleston SC for vacation. Any recommendations on which historic houses or museums to visit to see period furniture? Particularly Thomas Elfe furniture.

Kirk Rush

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Re: Charleston Museums and historic houses
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2018, 08:20:53 AM »
The Charleston Museum would be a good place to go, and the Joseph Manigault House is right there, too.  Be sure to see the Heyward-Washington House.  Just strolling around the historic district and looking at all the old housed is a treat for me.  Hope you enjoy your trip/

Kirk
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Mark Maleski

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Re: Charleston Museums and historic houses
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2018, 12:54:18 PM »
I agree with Kirk Rush's suggestion for the Charleston Museum.  If I could only visit one house museum in Charleston it'd be the Heywood Washington house, no hesitation.  You'll see several Thomas Elfe pieces, as well as the spectacular Holmes-Edwards bookcase. The Nathanial Russel house is probably next on my list, but more for the architecture than the furniture.  The houses on the battery are newer and tend to be filled with Regency furniture, if that's your thing (it's not mine).

Be sure to explore the antique shops on King Street.

Sam Rhodes

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Re: Charleston Museums and historic houses
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2018, 06:36:09 AM »
Thanks for the suggestions. It looks like they have moved a lot of their furniture at The Charleston Museum off exhibit. The person at the information desk knew of only a few pieces. The Hayward-Washington House was the best with several Thomas Elfe and Robert Walker pieces. The Nathanial Russell house as good too. Both houses had outstanding architectural details as well. The Gibbes museum on Meeting Street had about 10 Federal pieces nicely displayed. One surprising place was Boone Hall plantation. While the house was built in 1935 (although there were houses on that spot since the 17th century) it had a 18th Century piecrust table that was phenomenal. Unfortunately no photography was permitted. They don’t have a curator on staff and the docent asked whether it was English or American. I think there is an opportunity there for someone with much knowledge than me to study this piece,