Author Topic: Burnout  (Read 2059 times)

Bruce Leonard

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Burnout
« on: May 31, 2016, 08:53:41 AM »
Has anybody out there in SAPFM land ever suffered from burnout?  After completing a piece that took about 400 hours or so make I've no desire to get back into the workshop at this point.  Luckily, I do not depend on making period furniture for a living so I can take as long a break as I want.  In one sense its good because I can now focus on some other things around the house that require my attention. Maybe I'll get the urge once again in the fall.

Bruce

Freddy Roman

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Re: Burnout
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2016, 10:35:39 PM »
Bruce,

The short answer is... Yes. But how I Deal with "burnout" isn't by not going back into the shop. Rather I make something for myself since I am a professional. Or I would do some shop improvements. I love my shop and what I do. Usually the worst part of the day is leaving the shop. But when I need stress relief which is often I box a few times a week, I weight lift, and I spartan train. I want to be able to do this work for a long time, so I must keep myself strong and flexible.  

Cheers,

FR
« Last Edit: June 01, 2016, 09:48:20 PM by Freddy Roman »
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Peter Storey Pentz

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Re: Burnout
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2016, 12:53:44 PM »
Bruce,

I think we all experience burnout to some degree at some time.  Big projects require a lot of physical and mental work and self-discipline to see them through from beginning to end.  I am just finishing the third one in a row, and it seems to be going slower and slower.  Being a pro and having the promise of a check at the end helps, but I usually find it necessary to take a break after the big ones.  Like you, I look for small jobs, easy repairs, etc. so that I can get a sense of accomplishment quickly. PSP

Mark Maleski

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Re: Burnout
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2016, 03:15:46 PM »
This is just a variation on Freddy's and Peter's theme, but I like to have 2 projects going at any one time: the first is a "big" project (currently a Chippendale chest of drawers), the second is a smaller project (shop improvements, simple box or side table, etc).  Depending on the day and my mood, I can either get a quick fix on the smaller project or make a small amount of progress on the larger one.  Obviously, this extends the time to completion of both, but I like the balance it brings.  I'm a hobbyist and am building solely for my own satisfaction.

Bruce Leonard

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Re: Burnout
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2016, 08:47:03 AM »
Thanks for the insights guys.  Interestingly enough, the 425-hour project I referred to was a commission...the first one I ever got.  I had my foot on the gas peddle the whole time. This reminds me of a saying that one way to take the fun out of a hobby is to do it for money.  This has been an eye-opener for an amateur, who may have wondered what it would be about doing this for a semi-living some day, in terms of what you professionals may experience.   In the mean time, I think I'll hold off on the shop equipment and hand tool liquidation sale for a while yet.  : )

Bruce   

Peter Storey Pentz

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Re: Burnout
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2016, 09:13:59 PM »
Bruce,

Another thing that helps me relax are projects that rely on the use of a hammer and nails.  PSP

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Burnout
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2016, 05:43:40 PM »
Bruce, You don't have burnout. You have builder's remorse. Your first construction project for a monetary response is gone, sent off to a new home. Will it be taken care of properly? Will they know all you have done to make this piece the best piece possible? Just as our forefathers, you have joined a proud tradition of building in America for a profit. It's a hard job that more people need to experience today. Thank you for carrying on an American tradition !!! I wish I knew how to ad a thumbs up emogee. Jump back on the wagon tomorrow to help carry on this proud tradition.

chobbs66

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Re: Burnout
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2016, 01:51:16 PM »
Bruce,

I think you are deserving of a break after building the piece.  I kind of agree with Freddy (scary....) but you should take up one of your bucket list projects that is only on your list because you think it's cool, not because it will teach a skill, demonstrate proficiency, etc.  And the smaller the better so you won't be starting down a 6 or 12 month project every time you walk into the garage.  And a new tool you have been putting off might help too (are there any left that you don't have?)!

I also suggest you hit a museum and fall in love again with the objects we all love. A quick walk through the Kaufman collection or drive to Philly?

I for one hope and pray you get back to the bench soon as I love seeing your pics and wishing I made whatever you show.  I know you will, personally I'm not worried a bit about you!

CH
Son of a period furnituremaker, serious hobbiest since 2003 or so.  Construction Manager by day.  2 children, ages 15 and 13.

Bruce Leonard

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Re: Burnout
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2016, 11:30:36 AM »
Calvin:  And you know which piece it is I'm referring to!!  (Although I do not blame Mr. White  for this.) Thanks for the kind words of support and advice.

Jeff:  Long live brown furniture and brown furniture makers!!  (Let's see, SBFM just doesn't have the same ring as SAPFM.)

Peter:  Yes!! Indeed I find hammering nails to be strangely therapeutic!

Bruce