Author Topic: Milk Paint or other ???  (Read 1400 times)

Dan_B

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Milk Paint or other ???
« on: March 07, 2016, 04:25:32 PM »
I am building a Seymour ladies writing desk. ( taking forever)
The pigeon holes/gallery are painted  blue, except for a mahogany strip on the front edge. What paint would you recommend?
I have never used milk paint and if that is the recommendation would appreciate any tips.
I bought an angled brush to get in the gallery although I could paint the parts first and then glue up, although I am leaning against that.
Thanks
dan
Dan

Peter Storey Pentz

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Re: Milk Paint or other ???
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2016, 12:40:37 AM »
Dan,

Unless you are prepared to branch out from woodworking to developing skills in paint making, the powdered milk paint available on the market is the closest you can get to a period paint.  However, the robin's egg blue that is common on Seymour and Seymour school furniture is not one of their stock colors.  You can probably mix colors and get close.  First Tip: Mix samples of the dry pigments dry to get a color match.  It will be close to the actual color when the paint is dry. Second tip:  Always measure accurately and take notes, you never know when you will want to repeat yourself.  Third tip:  Milk paint has a texture unlike modern paint.  If you want it smoother, try thinning it slightly and strain it through cheesecloth.  Fourth tip:  See what happens when you coat the paint with shellac.  I have found that some color and sheen adjustments can be made this way.  Fifth tip:  Always do samples and make sure they are very dry before going further.   PSP

Dan_B

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Re: Milk Paint or other ???
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2016, 11:50:54 AM »
Dan,

Unless you are prepared to branch out from woodworking to developing skills in paint making, the powdered milk paint available on the market is the closest you can get to a period paint.  However, the robin's egg blue that is common on Seymour and Seymour school furniture is not one of their stock colors.  You can probably mix colors and get close.  First Tip: Mix samples of the dry pigments dry to get a color match.  It will be close to the actual color when the paint is dry. Second tip:  Always measure accurately and take notes, you never know when you will want to repeat yourself.  Third tip:  Milk paint has a texture unlike modern paint.  If you want it smoother, try thinning it slightly and strain it through cheesecloth.  Fourth tip:  See what happens when you coat the paint with shellac.  I have found that some color and sheen adjustments can be made this way.  Fifth tip:  Always do samples and make sure they are very dry before going further.   PSP

Thanks, I will try it following your advice
Dan
Dan

swifty6

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Re: Milk Paint or other ???
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2017, 02:43:33 PM »
I have just completed building a Southern Hunt Board out of clear Eastern White Pine painted with "Real Milk Paint, Terra Coatta  We have seen similar pieces in North Carolina that were painted.
I noticed that the web site for Real Paint seems to push Tung oil as a top coat.
What is the historical standard of a top coat for milk paint?
« Last Edit: August 23, 2017, 08:08:27 PM by swifty6 »

Freddy Roman

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Re: Milk Paint or other ???
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2017, 12:23:04 AM »
I prefer milk paint from general finishes. 

FR
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gmatranga

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Re: Milk Paint or other ???
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2017, 03:11:24 PM »
Freddy-- I also like General Finishes milk paint. In fact I work at a Woodcraft store and sell a lot of it. But its not really milk paint. It's some sort of acrylic concoction. And if you have to use it in a dry climate their "Extender" is a necessity. The extender slows drying time and helps with flow out. But don't ever use Floetrol. It will keep the paint from drying properly.

George