Author Topic: Del Val Fall Meeting, Kinloch Woodworking October 17, 2015  (Read 1054 times)

Jim Marsh

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Del Val Fall Meeting, Kinloch Woodworking October 17, 2015
« on: October 29, 2015, 09:20:36 AM »
On a pleasantly warm day for our all-day meeting at Doug Mooberry’s shop at Kinloch Woodworking in Kennett Square, PA we were greeted by wonderful apple cider donuts and coffee provide by Doug’s wife Pat.
Doug split us into 2 groups for the first two sessions; the first group was treated to a tour of Kinloch’s showroom which fills an entire late nineteenth century home. It could better be described as a museum of period reproductions and more contemporary offerings to suit his clientele. Doug also showed slides of prior work such as bed post carvings, finals and other eighteenth century reproductions.
Next we moved to Doug’s workshop where one of Kinloch’s employees, Matt demonstrated cutting and installing butterflies using a router freehand cutting to the line them with minimal cleanup with a chisel mostly in the corners, this man has nerves of steel. Matt also demonstrated their way of cutting dovetails, making and installing inlays and cutting mitered intersecting joints for sash bars in glass cabinet doors.
After lunch we were treated to a trip to the wood barn. We were astonished to see a collection of some of the finest woods; mahogany in nearly 4 feet widths, tiger maple 5”to 6’ thick and 20" to 30” wide and more species to mention, it’s an amazing collection and well cared for.
Next was a presentation by Ashley King, a horologist, appraiser, and lecturer on clocks. Clocks are his passion; he studied in Germany learning his craft. He showed various clock forms including a wooden clock works, wood clock cases from various periods. The wood workers artistry in selecting the proper woods for making both the gears and cases was of great interest.
 Lastly, but certainly not the least John Owen showed us what he learned over the past 30 years of carving. John studied with various carvers during that time and always looked for better methods of working. He found what he didn’t like and continually improvised until he found how he wanted to work. His workbench became a simply constructed flat surface at a height he found suitable. Lighting his work, the various ways he holds the different carvings, the clever way he holds and stores his chisels. What John showed us was some simple and practical ways to approach carving.

Our sincere thanks to Doug Mooberry for his time and knowledge and warm hospitality.A great time was had by all.