Author Topic: Keepsake box  (Read 2405 times)

James L

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Keepsake box
« on: March 27, 2013, 05:19:41 PM »
I would like to make a reproduction of a "keepsake box" from the 1800 to 1850 period as a gift to our daughter on her up coming birthday. Searching the forum has given me some basic ideas, as well there was some limited information on the internet. Mr. Follansbee site offered quite a bit on a carved box that is nailed together. He did note that there may be some that were dovetailed, but that is rare. I assume that this was from an earlier period. There is a "history of dovetails" post on the forum that contained much information. However, I have not stumbled on any specific information regarding period keepsake boxes. There is much information on British and French boxes of this nature, within that period, but they all seem to be highly finished, with inlays and marquetry. I had planned to make a simpler, but dovetailed box out of either cherry or walnut. Now I am not sure if that would fit historically or not.

Any help in guiding me to information that would get me started is appreciated. Size, joinery, hinges, mortise lock(?), species , finish, inlays or veneer?

I am new to this forum and hope that these questions are within the intent of the forum. Thank you for providing such a great place for information.
Best regards,
Jim
Best Regards,
Jim

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Keepsake box
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2013, 06:27:07 PM »
Jim, I would recommend a miniature blanket chest. A dovetailed case with two drawers on the front of the bottom. A lid that would lift up revealing a tray that would lift up out of the case. Welcome to the forum!!
« Last Edit: March 28, 2013, 06:54:16 PM by Jeff L Headley »

msiemsen

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Re: Keepsake box
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2013, 09:20:42 AM »
James,
If you ae a member go to the SAPFM home page and sign in. Go to the P4 antiques link. When you get in search "bible box" , that is what they are generically called. several good samples.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 09:23:03 AM by msiemsen »
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zacc

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Re: Keepsake box
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2013, 11:03:27 AM »
Another possibility is the Lonnie Bird Tea Caddy which he describes in his Bandsaw book.  Its a small box, I think much smaller than the ones described in the other posts.

I tried but was unable to post a link to his furniture gallery, but there is a picture of the Tea Caddy posted there.

Good luck on your project.

Jeff Saylor

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Re: Keepsake box
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2013, 11:08:52 PM »
How about this?  Its a reproduction of a miniature blanket chest made in Centre Co. PA circa 1830.  Features dovetailed case, lift lid, till inside, on turned feet.  12 3/4 long x 6 wide x 8 high.  Hope this helps.
Jeff Saylor
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Jeff Saylor

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Re: Keepsake box
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2013, 11:11:23 PM »
Another pic.
Jeff Saylor
SAPFM #211  Hobbies include hunting, fishing, making furniture, searching for old tools at flea markets.

Jeff Saylor

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Re: Keepsake box
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2013, 11:12:25 PM »
One more:
Jeff Saylor
SAPFM #211  Hobbies include hunting, fishing, making furniture, searching for old tools at flea markets.

James L

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Re: Keepsake box
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2013, 09:27:23 AM »
Thank you all for your replies, they have helped me in my search.

One question that has presented itself is that when I search through old bible box pictures I note two things. It seems that the simpler boxes, i.e. pine or poplar have very little embellishment and used carving as the means of decoration; whereas the nicer woods or veneered boxes had finer hardware and etc. On the plainer boxes I see the bottom end-grain showing at the sides. So my question is how was the case attached to the bottom? The sides of the cases were dovetailed. Long grain glueing, nails, rabbet to form a half-lap joint all the way around? Any help would be appreciated, thanks.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2013, 12:45:14 PM by James L »
Best Regards,
Jim