Author Topic: Resoling a period drawer  (Read 5748 times)

Peter Storey Pentz

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Re: Resoling a period drawer
« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2012, 12:04:00 AM »
Pam,

I try to encourage my clients to avoid absurdity, it doesn't hold up over time.  PSP

Peter Storey Pentz

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Re: Resoling a period drawer
« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2012, 09:06:39 PM »
Jeff,

You did it by feel?  Someday, I want to hear the long version of that story.  PSP

Peter Storey Pentz

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Re: Resoling a period drawer
« Reply #17 on: December 18, 2012, 09:11:13 PM »
Randy, 

When the N. Y. Times article was printed, a friend sent me a copy.  It is an excellent tale of how there really is no honor among theives.  PSP

tom427cid

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Re: Resoling a period drawer
« Reply #18 on: December 27, 2012, 02:54:50 PM »
Recently I was called upon to repair a drawer side-needed full resoling-of a drawer to a New England highboy. The side had split full length and the sole piece had gone missing. While the piece was not to be in daily use,it was going to be used. I was able to find a like piece that had a pretty good color and grain match. When the repair was done it could be noticed but not casually. While my philosophy about repairs may be somewhat different,I believe that a piece of furniture that was designed to be used and is used is going to wear and in time there will be repairs made. If the repairs are made to blend into their surroundings(do not read hidden) then IMHO the repairs have now become part of the history of the piece.
If you hold to the belief of Antiques Roadshow that repairs will dramaticly reduce the value then I submit that the piece is only for display no matter whether the drawers work or not.
Just a little ole country cabinetmaker....

Jack Plane

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Re: Resoling a period drawer
« Reply #19 on: December 27, 2012, 07:02:29 PM »
The Antiques Roadshow mantra "Leave well alone" is well founded. It's a broad edict to all the watching-at-home would-be restorers (and around 95% of professional restorers) to not tamper with stuff they have little or no understanding of and whose interference would, in the majority of cases, irreparably damage and devalue the piece.

Surely making a worn or damaged antique serviceable is commendable as long as it's done reversibly, sympathetically and without overly impinging on original material; and if the repairs can be done such that they don't show new wood or otherwise shout out "Look at me!" when viewed normally, then who could possibly raise a grievance?
Regards, Jack.

tom427cid

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Re: Resoling a period drawer
« Reply #20 on: December 29, 2012, 08:56:10 PM »
Hi JP,
Following the criteria of your second paragraph-this repair should stand the test.
When doing the repair I only removed enough material to establish a true mating surface on the outside of the drawer side. There is no evidence of a repair if the drawer is viewed from the inside.I used old wood and selected a piece that gave me the best possible grain match-admittedly not perfect but pretty close. I also did add a bit of color to the new piece to bring the color closer to the original side. I also took the pains to closely match the wear(dimensions from the other side) on the sole.And finally it was assembled with hide glue.
While not all repairs are as intensively detail oriented-each repair must be approached on a case by case basis to plan the most effective and efficient approach.
tom
Just a little ole country cabinetmaker....

Jack Plane

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Re: Resoling a period drawer
« Reply #21 on: December 30, 2012, 12:41:11 AM »
Well done Tom, that sounds like an effectual and ethical repair.
Regards, Jack.