Author Topic: Shaded Fan Materials  (Read 3570 times)

awleonard

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Shaded Fan Materials
« on: February 15, 2012, 03:24:14 PM »
I am planning on making my first shaded fan for the center of my current table project.  Just wondering what veneers are good to use and perhaps where to get them? 

Any tips on creating a shaded fan would be appreciated too.  I've lots of good info out there.
Thanks,

Tony

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Shaded Fan Materials
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2012, 10:05:48 PM »
Satinwood might be a good first choice of wood. But you will also need the finest sand (say from the warm winds blown dunes from just below the outer banks maybe just above Wilmington NC. I have found works better for shading if you are meaning by heat. To much heat will cause early deterioration  of the veneer. For the right price (gas money) I could go tomorrow and pick you up all the sand you need. Where should I ship it (I could have said the Keys)? There are many different natural dyes if you are talking about with colors.

klkirkman

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Re: Shaded Fan Materials
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2012, 07:41:42 AM »
There happens to be a fairly lengthy article on veneer heat shading in the issue of Fine Woodworking that just arrived here a few days ago.

Karl
Karl

ttalma

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Re: Shaded Fan Materials
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2012, 09:03:10 AM »
Here's a link to a pop wood video by Rob Millard there was an articl in issue #167 FROM 2008.

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/video/corner_inlay_video
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CBWW

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Re: Shaded Fan Materials
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2012, 11:27:50 AM »
I would suggest holly as well as satinwood.  I have done shading on my woodstove... not using sand.  Had to do it with a fan in the window and when the wife and kids were out.  But, it worked great.

Pete
www.cherrybrookwoodworks.com


kerry grubb

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Re: Shaded Fan Materials
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2012, 06:24:40 PM »
I have had success with holly. I do agree with Jeff though, that a super fine sand needs to be used. I tried play sand from home depot the first time and it was disasterous. I got beach sand (Daytona Beach) that has the consistency of almost baby powder, and it works fantastic. The play sand was like working with stones compared to the beach sand. The finer the more even the heat will be. And like Jeff, if your willing to "pony up" I would be glad to pick some up for you.lol.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Shaded Fan Materials
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2012, 08:53:56 PM »
Sounds like a beach trip to me. Coastal. SAPFM could rent a bus and we could all pay for our own food and lodging ( $45 a night Haa Haa). We could hit all the hot spots up and down the East coast over a week and visit all the SAPFM chapters that might be on the way. With free sand at every beach. 

Larry G

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Re: Shaded Fan Materials
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2012, 10:23:11 PM »
I have found very fine aquarium sand will also work very well.
No bus required.

Larry G

awleonard

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Thanks all!
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2012, 09:28:35 AM »
Wel, I happened to have brought back a small bag of sugar white sand from Seaside FL from our last trip down, so I can justify financing a trip (although we are already daydreaming abut our next visit).  I've played around with some shading using some highly striped anegre to make "ribbons" on some small music boxes (using hand crank music works I found at a now defunct toy store at the beach).  I have some tiger maple veneer and just got three pieces of nice satinwood from Certainly Wood.  I'll play with that over the weekend and see how it goes.  I found several sheets of soemthing with a "bees wing" type figure that I plan on using for the table top.  It is beautiful stuff.  I'm sure I bought it on ebay, but darned if I can figure out what it is!  Maybe I'll post a pic and see if anybody recognizes it.  Nice stuff whatever it is.  I've got a sample glued down with two coats of poly on it and it is really something.  The satinwood I got isn't as nice as the last batch, but it is still not bad. 

Tony

msiemsen

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Re: Shaded Fan Materials
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2012, 11:36:07 AM »
You can also use very fine salt. It does take longer at the beach to make salt than to gather up sand but you need something to do there anyway. Teach your kids about Gandhi while you are at it.
Mike Siemsen
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Jeff Saylor

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Re: Shaded Fan Materials
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2012, 08:02:27 PM »
You may want to check out your local auto paint shop.  They may have very fine sand blasting sand which works well.
Jeff Saylor
SAPFM #211  Hobbies include hunting, fishing, making furniture, searching for old tools at flea markets.

swedishiron

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Re: Shaded Fan Materials
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2012, 12:20:31 AM »
Another reliable source for fine sand are the bags of reptile sand available @ most pet stores.