Author Topic: horn veneer  (Read 11145 times)

R Bohn

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horn veneer
« on: October 11, 2011, 10:12:58 AM »
I am working on a project that requires some cow horn veneer[Texas Long Horn]. I have read the history books for a process ,but I would prefer  to buy it than make it. I know about the suppliers out side the USA , but I have been informed by horn collectors that there is a difference in color.I have also been told these collectors can spot the difference from across the room.On the chance I can't find the veneer, is there anyone out there that has any experience making veneer?  I would sure like to hear from you.  Thanks Randy
Restoration and Conservation of Fine Antiques Serving Museums, Dealers and Private Collectors Nation wide since 1979

CBWW

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Re: horn veneer
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2011, 08:52:08 AM »
Sounds like a very interesting project.  FWIW- I have never cut horn.  Worked with a little ivory and mother of pearl  and tagua nut ...  I would probably try and cut the veneer on the tablesaw.  I would have a zero clearance insert in the saw and a thin kerf blade.  I recently saw a very thin kerf blade for about $170. but cant remember the name now.  I would set it up to have the drop on the left side of the blade.  I will assume you understand how to set this up on the saw...   With the long horn, holding it through the cut can be accomplished by securing it to a sacrificial board.  Years ago I cut tagua nut by 5 minute epoxying it to a board.  Worked great.  I would make sure that the horn is supported as close to the blade as possible.  You could also slice it onthe bandsaw but I think the tablesaw will give you a better cleaner face.  DO these have to be cut at an angle like oysters?  What is the color difference?  What do the history books say about the process?  I am curious as to how it works out for you..

Pete
www.cherrybrookwoodworks.com


John Cashman

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Re: horn veneer
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2011, 10:34:37 PM »
I've turned a little bit of horn, and won't do it again. Smelled like a skunk died.

R Bohn

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Re: horn veneer
« Reply #3 on: October 25, 2011, 09:37:46 PM »
Hi All
   In the spirit of the forum, sharing information,I'm going to pass on some info I have gathered. It's been some time since I've been at the bottom of the learning curve, but that's where I found myself with this project. Actually, the older I get, the more I realize I don't know.  Anyway, I have met some very interesting people in my quest to make veneer out of cow horns. I thought I would start by finding someone that knows something about horns, Alan Rogers was a good start.http://www.longhornmuseum.com/default.asp
  I have decided to cut the horn by hand, to eliminate the smell of burning horn. I am also going to to polish the horn before cutting it. Some what different from working with wood.By now some technical information would come in handy, with the power of the internet I found this booklet. http://www.florilegium.org/files/CRAFTS/Working-Horn-pamphlet.pdf   Lots of good stuff in there.
  Did you know spoons , cup ,and bowls can be made out of horn?
   Not done yet, Mike Siemsen sent me this bit of info.http://www.northhouse.org/courses/courses/course.cfm/cid/140   I haven't tapped this one,yet!!  Thanks mike
  With horn coming from Texas, and the presses made, I have just a few more people to talk to before firing  up the pot of water. So , to be continued.              Randy   
    Oh yeah, checked out your web site, nice work Pete!!
Restoration and Conservation of Fine Antiques Serving Museums, Dealers and Private Collectors Nation wide since 1979

msiemsen

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Re: horn veneer
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2011, 01:02:10 AM »
I look forward to a good demonstration sometime in the future.
Mike
Mike Siemsen
Green Lake Clock Company
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R Bohn

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Re: horn veneer
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2013, 10:57:22 PM »
Hi All
 I'm back home for a few weeks, what a summer!! I've seen flood damage, tornado damage and just bad luck. The courage some people have is nothing short of amazing!  Couldn't fix everything but did my best.
 Anyway, every chance I could, I was back to this horn veneer quest. The horn is heated to separate it into thin layers. It took me some time to find the right process and I was also able to make horn window panes I have heard about in my studies as well as veneer. So with veneer in hand I have one more hoop to jump through, How to fuse the pieces together to form a seamless     ribbon. I can tell some kind of heat process was used by the veneer still on the chair.Thanks to my new friend Joe from the Professional Finishers Group and my old friend Dr. Hemmingway from the UK,[ what a source of info] I am on the final leg of a long journey in history that had little documentation.
  As you can see by the dates of the posts, some things take a little more time!!
All most there !!
Randy
Restoration and Conservation of Fine Antiques Serving Museums, Dealers and Private Collectors Nation wide since 1979

msiemsen

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Re: horn veneer
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2013, 12:13:17 AM »
Can't wait to hear the story and see the end results!
Mike Siemsen
Green Lake Clock Company
There are II kinds of people in the world. Those that can read roman numerals and those that can't

Jack Plane

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Re: horn veneer
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2013, 02:38:18 AM »
If horn is anything like tortoiseshell (it is... they're both keratin), then it can be fused with heat and pressure.
Regards, Jack.


TheCreativeHand

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Re: horn veneer
« Reply #9 on: November 21, 2013, 05:30:24 PM »
I heard back from Patrice Lejeune over at the American School of French Marquetry who suggested checking out Atelier Delaruelle who is usually cheaper than George.

blond horn veneer - Atelier Delaruelle
http://www.atelierdelaruelle.com/achat/cat-blond-horn-veneer-1057.html

Horn plates scraps ~120 x 50 x 3 mm, 100gr (~1/2pcs) - Atelier Delaruelle
http://www.atelierdelaruelle.com/horn-scraps-1148/horn-plates-scraps-120-x-50-x-3-mm-100gr-1/2pcs--1101.html

flamed horn veneer - Atelier Delaruelle
http://www.atelierdelaruelle.com/achat/cat-flamed-horn-veneer-1151.html