Author Topic: Using Spokeshave (Cont.)  (Read 9033 times)

Martin S.

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Using Spokeshave (Cont.)
« on: October 01, 2006, 12:04:40 PM »
Thankyou everyone for the input for using the spokeshave...Making progress, but not there yet.  I belive it was dull, so I do indeed have it nice and sharp, cutting at skew and believe holding properly, cutting downhill.  So, it is sorta cutting, but getting chattering.  It seems I would want to make the throat more narrow, but there is not way to adjust that on this version (Dave's Shaves (wooden)).  Any other thoughts?

FYI: This model is a pain to adjust the depth of cut as you need to remove the blade to adjust.

Martin

pampine

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Re: Using Spokeshave (Cont.)
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2006, 05:01:05 PM »
You could try shimming the blade.

Pam

David Conley

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Re: Using Spokeshave (Cont.)
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2006, 06:52:24 PM »
Martin,

If it's chattering, the blade is dull, or you are taking too much of a cut, or both.   It really sounds to me like the blade is not razor sharp.   What method/system and/or stone are you using to sharpen the blade?  And what is the final grit?

I took a look at Dave's Shaves' website and he has some good information to help you.   Check out his page at:  http://www.ncworkshops.com/sharpening_tips.html

Also, it sounds like you have an older design with the screws under the blade.  This is still a pretty quick adjustment, and once it is set, you never have to touch it again (in theory).  It took me about as much time to setup my homemade shave with the adjustable screws under the blade as it does to setup a handplane that uses wedges.  This makes me think that your blade is still not sharp enough.

The ability to sharpening tools is one of the first watershed skills we have to learn.  I used to sharpen to a 4000 grit Japanese waterstone and I thought I had mastered sharpening.  Then, I got a 6000 grit stone, and realized that 4000 grit would work, but the 6000 grit was the ultimate in sharpness.  Then, I got an 8000 grit stone and realized that the 6000 grit was pretty good, but the 8000 was still sharper.  I am no longer foolish enough to think 8000 grit is the ultimate in sharpness, nor do I know if it is worth it to go to the next finer grit.  The 8000 is really good! 

Cheers,
David


 


Martin S.

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Re: Using Spokeshave (Cont.)
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2006, 07:49:59 AM »
David,
Thanks for the info, I will work on it, it did shave my arm with ease, but I was never convinced that was a good test...

I use the Spydfrco Ceramic stones (you can see them at http://www.fandfwoodcarving.com/sharpstone.htm , althought I did not get them from this place).  After using the ultrafine, it looks just like a mirror.

I tried using a strop loaded with green stuff afterwards, but not sure if that helped or hurt. 

martin

Paul

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Re: Using Spokeshave (Cont.)
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2006, 09:43:16 PM »
Martin,
I agree with David that your blade is probably still dull.  I spent a long time going through several different ways to sharpen.  It can get confusing with all the different tools and everyone claiming theirs is the best.  I finally settled on Norton waterstones and I am sure the Japanese waterstones David mentions work good also.  I looked at the website you posted and the one you mentioned using last is a 2000 grit.  The Norton waterstones go from 1000, 2000,4000 and then to 8000 grit.  The 1000 is for major removal and repairing a damaged blade.  Anyway if you go through the 2000, 4000 and 8000 you will get a sharp blade.  Lie-Nielsen Toolworks www.lie-nielsen.com  and  Craftsman Studiop www.craftsmanstudio.com sell the Norton waterstones.  On te Lie-Nielsen site under books and vides and then under videos there is one on sharpening by David Charlesworth.  There is also a video on using spokeshaves called Drawknives, Spokeshaves and Travishers--A Chairmaker's Tool Kit by
Brian Boggs.  I have ordered some of these videos and find them very helpful.  the are much better than books because it is like sitting in a classrom and watching what they are doing instead of looking at pictures or just reading the text.  I hope this helps.  Good luck and keep trying.  One of the great things I like about woodworking is when you try expanding on your ability and then you succed. 
Paul

« Last Edit: October 03, 2006, 09:57:24 PM by Paul »

David Conley

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Re: Using Spokeshave (Cont.)
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2006, 09:16:20 PM »
Martin,

Paul found out that you are using a 2000 grit stone.  , I also checked out the site, but I could not tell what grit measuring system they were using.   A 2000 US grit maybe finer than an 8000 Japanese grit.  If you are getting a mirror finish, then I think you may have a US 2000 grit stone.  A 2000 Japanese grit will leave the surface a bit hazy.

Now my confession, I cannot use a leather strop without dulling a blade.  Sure, it looks pretty, but I press too hard into the soft leather and it just rounds that keen edge.  So, I don’t strop any of my blades.  I will only sharpen up to my 8000 stones, and stop there.

So try sharpening it again, but this time, don’t strop the blade and let us know how it worked out.

Cheers,
David

Martin S.

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Re: Using Spokeshave (Cont.)
« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2006, 07:54:34 AM »
Thanks for the Stoping info...thats what I was seeing...I will try again.  I'm off to visit MESDA this, so be a bit before I get shop time.

I talked to they guy that I bought the cermaic stones from, he said the company says the UltraFine is really 8000. 

martin

windsors

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Re: Using Spokeshave (Cont.)
« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2006, 04:15:54 PM »
It sounds to melike you need to ajust your depth of cut. I use a spoke often in my shop makeing Windsor chairs. I set one side a little higher than the other side. this alows me to not have to ajust the heigth as often. Bob

Martin S.

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Re: Using Spokeshave (Cont.)
« Reply #8 on: November 04, 2006, 10:52:51 AM »
Thanks to all who have made suggestions.  I finally have success!  There is nothing like the satisfaction of a handtool “singing” along.

What I finally determined after many hours of playing around and more research, was the wooden low angle spokeshave was not the tool for the job (at least in my hands,  I have seen Mac Headly do what I was tying to do with the same tool, mine was clearly defective! <grin> ).  I purchased the Boggs metal spokeshave from Lie Nelson; out of the box, was able to get perfect results.  However, all the suggestions I received made it so very quickly.

On to the next thing to learn in life...

Martin

DonC

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Re: Using Spokeshave (Cont.)
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2006, 01:23:48 AM »
I also found that using a strop rounded the sharp edge from the stones. I have since stopped using leather. I now use the firm cardboard from the last page of a spiral notebook and apply honing compound to this. It works great and YES, it is better than 8000 grit. I prefer the Green paste and/or White Gold from Rich Nottos.
His address is 7182 Millstone St Spring Hill Fl 34606 352 688-2334
By the way, I also have another very long strop for plane irons. It is eggshell formica glued to MDF. This formica has enough "Tooth/texture" to collect and hold the honing compound and is firm enough that you won't round off the edge while honing.