Author Topic: Draw-leaf table  (Read 20725 times)

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #30 on: February 14, 2011, 10:31:25 PM »
Where to stop?

jacon4

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #31 on: February 15, 2011, 05:42:19 PM »
Interesting that even back in the day, they figured out that tables of this weight needed iron to help keep them from racking.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #32 on: February 15, 2011, 06:17:35 PM »
At first I thought that maybe the bolts were added later but with other examples posted earlier it makes me wonder.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #33 on: February 15, 2011, 06:20:59 PM »
I don't think that the bolts are for racking but ease of moving.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #34 on: February 15, 2011, 06:24:48 PM »
Scalloped skirt without notches for leaf bearers

jacon4

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #35 on: February 15, 2011, 06:41:49 PM »
So the top rail M & T are not pinned? Just held together with nuts & bolts?

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #36 on: February 15, 2011, 07:05:01 PM »
The end sections are mortised and tenoned and pinned(Where is the spell check feature before posting?) and glued. Only length wise are bolted.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2011, 07:06:36 PM by Jeff L Headley »

Follansbee

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #37 on: February 15, 2011, 08:05:27 PM »
I agree that the bolts are for ease of assembly/moving. Picture getting an assembled one of these through seventeenth-century doorways.

Tables this size wouldn't really be prone to wracking if built right. The Connecticut Historical Society example is 3' wide by 6' long; and its components are huge. It's not bolted, but just pinned. I think you'd need to hit them with a Clydesdale to bust them up.

Thanks for the blow-by-blow Jeff. It's fun to watch. Don't stop, at least James & I are interested in seeing you build this thing. Am I correct that you are winging it, and the details are conjectural? It's the double-tenons I am wondering about...
Follansbee

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #38 on: February 15, 2011, 08:25:04 PM »
First question. Winging it? (Well YES)
Next Question. Double tenons?
I do appreciate everyone's response. I do think we will supply a better reproduction from everyones input and I do thank you.
« Last Edit: February 15, 2011, 10:09:15 PM by Jeff L Headley »

jacon4

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #39 on: February 16, 2011, 03:03:32 AM »
Yes, it is fun to watch, it's not often you see tables like this, they just dont fit very well in the modern mobile world.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #40 on: February 16, 2011, 05:00:52 PM »
Double tenons. I thought that leaving meat in the post was a good idea. That is the reason for spliting the tenon or the double tenon if that is what you mean. When I quoted this piece I should have charged by the pound.

jacon4

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #41 on: February 16, 2011, 05:33:45 PM »
LOL @ When I quoted this piece I should have charged by the pound

Bob Mustain

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #42 on: February 19, 2011, 03:04:09 PM »
Jeff,

I'm coming late to this discussion but I do have a source for you of an actual set of plans for one of these draw leaf tables.  The way it is constructed it should not mar the surface.  The source is one of my favorite authors, Charles Hayward.  The book is Period Furniture Designs.  The ISBN is 0-8069-7664-0.  I have a reprint published in 1982 by Sterling Publishing.  It's a paperback and should be available on line.  If not, I can make a photocopy for you.  I hope this helps.

Bob

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #43 on: February 19, 2011, 04:56:40 PM »
Bob, Thank you for your response. I think I have it figured out. I have to finish up this table by Wednesday so I can deliver it next week. I will try to post more pictures before delivery. Thank you everyone for your help with this project. Everyone's input has been greatly appreciated.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: Draw-leaf table
« Reply #44 on: February 19, 2011, 05:19:23 PM »
Mortised and tenoned top cross pieces.