Author Topic: Sharpening a V-Tool  (Read 13037 times)

jacon4

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Re: Sharpening a V-Tool
« Reply #30 on: November 25, 2010, 09:50:17 AM »
Although i have absolutely nothing to offer in the ways of sharpening a V-tool, there is a box comming to market tomorrow that demonstrates very well what this tool can do. Please DO NOT click this link till after the sale as i am going after this box and another loss like my recent fiasco with a boston joined chest would be to much to handle during this holiday season. J/K, click away.


http://www.garths.com/asp/fullcatalogue.asp?salelot=1054+++++++8+&refno=++194879&image=0

HAPPY THANKSGIVING EVERYONE!
« Last Edit: November 25, 2010, 04:28:33 PM by jacon4 »

John Cashman

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Re: Sharpening a V-Tool
« Reply #31 on: November 25, 2010, 10:10:22 AM »
I think the best way to sharpen a v-tool is to take one of Al Breed's carving classes. He'll modify and sharpen the first one for you, if you want. Then you get to do the next one. The thing you want to avoid is being the guy who sharpens v-tools really well. Then you'll have to do all of your friends' v-tools for them.

Peter points out that more recently manufactured tools have badly shaped and bloated keels. These thick parts absolutely must be thinned, or it doesn't matter how sharp the edge is. For those who want to see what Al and Phil Lowe have taught me about this process, Chris Pye has written a lengthy tome on v-tools. It is available on the web at http://www.chrispye-woodcarving.com/slipstones/v1.html. He asks for a donation to charity in exchange for downloading the pdf file. It is long, but worth looking at, and you can help someone in need.

The second issue is one that Al has written about here, grinding the profile so that the wings are forward of the V. Pye's pdf shows this only briefly, on page 81. If you want to see some examples of what Al means about regrinding v-tools, veiners, and others, go to http://www.allanbreed.com/profiles/blogs/carving-class-ctdphilly-draw and http://www.allanbreed.com/profiles/blogs/off-the-shelf. Take a look at the rest of his website while you are there.

If I had to pick the most indispensable carving tool, it be the vee. It's a bit cruel that it is the hardest to sharpen.




Adam Cherubini

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Re: Sharpening a V-Tool
« Reply #32 on: November 26, 2010, 07:34:51 AM »
Pretty sure Chris Storb didn't use the Vee at all when he carved the ball and claw foot in my shop.  As I recall, he didn't use it when he set in the low relief for the knee.  I think he only used it for veining on some pieces of foilage, but alot of the veins can't be done with the vee.


I was just looking at some 18th c picture frames (you know you're a woodworker when you go to a museum and your favorite work of art is a frame!!), and I was looking for exactly this sort of detail.  The frame i saw had a cross hatched ground which i thought was pretty cool.  The carvings had a high degree of relief, well over 1/2" in spots.

The veins really did appear to be cut with a vee tool, but they were beautifully smoothly curved (which I think it tricky- need a sharp vee for that).

I agree with John 1000%.  I think there is value in woodworking classes in general, but when we start talking about complex shapes, I just think it's REALLY hard to get that sort of thing from a book.  Good to be there with the guy, see his tools, see shapes, roll them around etc etc.  Taking carving classes is high on my priority list. 

Adam
 

jacon4

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Re: Sharpening a V-Tool
« Reply #33 on: November 26, 2010, 08:45:25 AM »
Hey Adam, whats the deal on the Arts & Mysteries blog, theres been no new posts since Sept. Have you stopped doing it or just taking a break?

Adam Cherubini

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Re: Sharpening a V-Tool
« Reply #34 on: November 26, 2010, 11:39:52 AM »
New posts today!

I get mental log jams occassionally.  I'm rereading Pye's book and I've been taking notes and really wanted to post them.  But I'm just not finished my notes so I have been stuck.  

One of my friends says woodworkers are all on the autism spectrum somewhere.  Some of us are a little further up the ladder than others!  You guys don't think you're okay, do you?  Underhill first alerted me to this fact. Woodworkers are all a little nuts.  I'm proud to count myself among you! 

Adam
« Last Edit: November 26, 2010, 11:45:08 AM by Adam Cherubini »