Author Topic: An Out Standing Chest  (Read 30801 times)

Jeff L Headley

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #30 on: February 27, 2010, 03:31:42 PM »
Here is another picture of the feet, front and back, and mold.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #31 on: March 09, 2010, 11:01:29 PM »
Drawer dovetails layout.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #32 on: March 09, 2010, 11:04:52 PM »
Sawing to the line.

sbachner

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #33 on: March 10, 2010, 08:10:34 AM »
Dovetail marker


How long has your dovetail marker been around?

gvforster

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #34 on: March 10, 2010, 10:04:16 AM »
Jeff,

It appears you are marking out drawer dovetails via dovetail marker vs. using drawer sides dovetails as template. In general, do you mark out intersecting dovetails "independently" , relying on accurate measurements to ensure the pieces go together

pearle

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #35 on: March 10, 2010, 04:18:55 PM »
It looks like you are using a relatively large number (say, 6) tails of a relatively small size. Over the years I've evolved to using a smaller number (say, 2 or 3) of larger tails. I do like to use fairly small pins (1/8" x 1/4" or so) as yours appear to be. Is there a period or regional preference for one style over the other?

Preston Earle

Jeff L Headley

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #36 on: March 10, 2010, 08:52:10 PM »
My dovetail marker is about 30 years old. Steve Hamilton made the one pictured for me.
I lay out my pins from my drawer sides tails to fit that side (I have a reason for this).
A good dovetail only fits once. Or at least that is what I've been told. Maybe someday I will make a good dovetail
A general rule for pin spacing is however far a tail reaches add that plus half again between pins.  
« Last Edit: March 17, 2010, 07:49:46 PM by Jeff L Headley »

Jeff L Headley

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #37 on: March 17, 2010, 06:20:31 PM »
The waist mold get glued across the front. Then the side pieces of the mold gets glued at the miter and then about 3" back from the front and then tacked in the center and at the back so the sides can move. Finish will wick under and hold the molding slightly until I'm dead

Jeff L Headley

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #38 on: March 21, 2010, 06:31:04 PM »
Drawers get dry fit before marking for cog beading (my family always called it cog beading).

Jeff L Headley

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #39 on: March 21, 2010, 06:39:25 PM »
Mark the drawer fronts with a piece of the beading on all four sides.

Jeff L Headley

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #40 on: March 21, 2010, 06:52:23 PM »
Plane the top and bottom of the drawer front to the line then glue up and slide in the case.

HSteier

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #41 on: March 22, 2010, 11:42:10 AM »
Hi Jeff.
Why not take the thickness of the "cog bead" directly with a marking guage and then scribe a line? Isn't it easier to plane to a scribed line?
Do you plane the rabbett for the bead or do you make the rabbett with a router?
And how about the sides? What technique do you use to achieve the cross grain rabbett?

Howard  Steier

Jeff L Headley

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #42 on: March 22, 2010, 12:46:42 PM »
Hello Howard, Happy Spring
The reason I mark the beading with a pencil in the manner I do is that if I have a slight difference in the fit of the drawer front this method will let me fit the bead to the case and not the drawer front which is what a cutting gauge would do. I will remove the waste top and bottom with a planer and then hand fit with my hand plane to the line. This a not a critical fit that requires a knife line like say a dovetail. After the glue sets up I will remove the drawer and cut the side notch usually with a router. The top and bottom bead cover the drawer completely the side pieces will go back about 3/8" as to not cover up the dovetails.

HSteier

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #43 on: March 22, 2010, 02:17:08 PM »
You glue on the top and bottom beads and then rabbett the side of the drawer with a router. How do you miter the beads to fit? When I do a beaded drawer I cut rabbetts all around so I can fit the beads strips with mitered ends.

Howard Steier

Jeff L Headley

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Re: An Out Standing Chest
« Reply #44 on: March 22, 2010, 04:55:22 PM »
I do the same thing. The glue up I mean is the drawer case not the bead. After the drawer sets up I will take the drawer out then cut the sides for the beading. Then apply all four pieces of beading mitering the joint where they intersect.